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The Philippine Army: Guardians of the Nation's Peace and Security

The Philippine Army, established on December 21, 1935, is the ground warfare branch of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP).

Committed to serving the nation, the Philippine Army plays a vital role in ensuring the country's territorial integrity, national sovereignty, and internal stability. Here's an overview of this esteemed military organization:



Philippine Army in Details

Philippine Army
official seal
Founded: December 21, 1935; 87 years ago
Country: Philippines
Type: Army
Role: Ground Warfare
Size: 101,250 active personnel, 100,000 ready reserves (as of writing)
Part of: Armed Forces of the Philippines
Garrison/HQFort Andres Bonifacio, Taguig City, Philippines
Motto: "Serving the People, Securing the Land"
Colors: Army Green 
Anniversary: March 22, Army Day


Mission and Vision


Mission: To provide the country with a credible and responsive Army capable of accomplishing its mission across the spectrum of conflict in the defense of the state and the people.

Vision: A professional, mission-ready, and highly capable Army that is a source of national pride.

Philippine Army Flag
Loading...

Roles and Responsibilities

National Defense: The Philippine Army is at the forefront of defending the nation against external threats, safeguarding the country's borders, and ensuring national security.

Internal Security: The Army plays a crucial role in addressing internal security challenges, including counterterrorism, counterinsurgency, disaster response, and peacekeeping operations.

Community Engagement: Beyond military operations, the Philippine Army actively engages with local communities, promoting development initiatives, conducting medical missions, and participating in outreach programs.

Philippine Army Headquarters at Fort Andres Bonifacio, Taguig City


Philippine Army History


Battles before Colonization

The beginnings of the Filipino land forces dates back before the Spanish and American colonial period. In that time, clans and barangays from different regions form their own armed groups primarily composed of hunters and land fighters. They served as defenders of the tribes or as warriors sent on strike missions against other barangays. On occasions, some clan forces would form alliances to attack more powerful opponents. Conventional weaponry during the pre‐colonial era includes Kris and Kampilan, Blowguns, and Lantaka. War-fare instruments of the Filipino forces continued to develop over time.

 

The Forces’ First Test (1521)

On April 27, 1521, the Filipino land forces were put to test. The Spaniards’ arrival in the 16th century in Mactan, Cebu ignited the Battle of Mactan as Lapu-Lapu defied to render loyalty to Magellan. The incident demonstrated the combined might of Filipino land forces complemented by early naval elements. Lapu-Lapu’s force was not “formally organized” as a Filipino Army during that time but the present‐day Philippine Army traces its beginnings to this brave and proud force of warriors of the Philippine Islands.

 

The Fight for Freedom (1892-1898)

The three century rule of the Spaniards led the Filipino warriors to form resistance movements to fight for their freedom. The Filipino people were clamoring for reforms and an end to the foreign rule because of the growing restiveness in the colony. On July 7, 1892, Andres Bonifacio founded the Samahang Kataastaasan, Kagalanggalang Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan, or simply “Katipunan” to muster freedom loving Filipinos for armed revolt. The Katipunan formed the nucleus of the Revolutionary Philippine Army.

Almost a year after the outbreak of war between the members of the Katipunan and the Spanish troops, another freedom fighter from a prominent clan ‒ Emilio Aguinaldo ‒ was elected President of the Philippine Revolutionary Government at the Tejeros Convention on March 22, 1897 in Tejeros, San Francisco de Malabon in Cavite. Artemio Ricarte, a Katipunan leader of numerous Filipino battles against Spain was also elected as Captain General of the Ejercito en la Republica de las Islas Filipinas or the Army of the Philippine Republic.

After years of fighting for freedom, of On June 12, 1898, the Filipino people achieved their awaited freedom as General Emilio Aguinaldo declared the Philippine’s Independence from Spain.

 

Philippine Army’s Rebirth (1898-1935)

The Filipino troops were to enjoy only a brief sense of victory and respite from combat when American forces came in to establish rule in the islands by virtue of the Treaty of Paris, which Spain co-signed with America on December 10, 1898. The treaty ceded the Philippines to the United States.

The Filipino-American War erupted on February 4, 1899. Due to the superiority of American arms, the Filipinos fell from one position to another until they were forced to disband. Even after the official cessation of hostilities and as the Americans have established government in 1901, the Filipino revolutionaries continued their struggle for freedom.

Aguinaldo was captured by American forces on March 23, 1901. The surrender of one of the most prominent leaders of the Philippine Revolution, General Miguel Malvar, on April 16, 1902 marked the official end of the “Philippine insurrection.” When the Philippines was established as a Commonwealth Republic of the United States of America on 15 November 1935, its President, Manuel Luis Quezon signed Commonwealth Act No.1, popularly known as the National Defense Act, which paved way for the birth of the new Philippine Army.

 

In World War II (1941-1945)

The onset of World War II in 1941 tested the might of the Commonwealth Philippine Army. Its two regular and ten reserve divisions undertook the defense of the Philippines. These divisions were incorporated into the United States Armed Forces in the Far East (USAFFE) under the command of General Douglas McArthur. Four military areas were activated after the war. The National Defense Forces organized under the National Defense Act was reorganized into the Armed Forces of the Philippines along which came the birth of four major services.

The post‐WWII Philippine Army was to be seen fulfilling the Philippine government’s commitment as a member of the United Nations to help bring peace in war‐ torn neighbor states. The Philippine Army spared five battalions which formed the Philippine Expeditionary Forces to Korea (PEFTOK) to carry out the campaign for democracy. The Philippine Civic Action Group to Vietnam (PhilCAGV) was sent to South Vietnam on a mission of peace, where army engineers helped build communities and army doctors and nurses provided medical services to the people.

 

Building the Headquarters; Expanding Horizons (1957- Early 70’s)

On July 10, 1957, the Philippine Army established its headquarters under the leadership of Brigadier General Leoncio S. Tan. The onset of the sixties ushered an expansion of the army's roles, which include participation in the socio-economic programs of the country, among others. To achieve greater flexibility and effectiveness, infantry divisions took the place of the military areas in the seventies.

 

The Army as a Nation Builder (1972-1986)

On September 21, 1972, the Martial Law era began. During the decade, military operations supported by civic action blocked the escalation of insurgency. The 1980s saw the Philippine Army in increasing peace and development roles and in a period of transition after the EDSA‐People Power Revolution, which spurred various initiatives toward transformation and reforms in internal security operations. The Philippine Army became more cognizant of its role not only as protector of the Filipino people, but also a partner in nation building.

 

Continued Sacrifice, Bravery and Patriotism (2000s)

On September 9, 2013, the Philippine Army prevented members of the Moro National Liberation Front to take over Zamboanga City which led to three-week fight. Twenty five government soldiers made the ultimate sacrifice in order to save innocent civilians and regain peace in the city.

On May 2017 to October 2017, a five-month long siege brought casualties and displaced individuals from their homes in Marawi, Lanao del Sur. The Battle of Marawi was one of the largest and longest urban warfare of the Philippine Army. One hundred sixty five government forces lost their lives to liberate the city from conflict. The Philippine Army continue play an important role in rebuilding the city.

 

The Philippine Army Today

Today, the Philippine Army supports the government’s whole-of-nation approach against insurgency led by the National Task Force to End the Local Communist Armed Conflict. The Army provides efficient instrument and structure for the employment of the whole-of-nation approach and also assists in the implementation of the Enhanced Comprehensive Local Integration Program offered to former rebels. These efforts complement the Army’s sustained anti-terrorism operations on the ground.

Moreover, the Philippine Army’s mandate led to a breakthrough with the framing of the Army Transformation Roadmap 2028, which was implemented in 2010. Capability upgrades, modernization initiatives, and campaigns for good governance and performance excellence in the transformation program ushered the Philippine Army to welcome paradigm shifts and optimistic milestones, which continue to fire up the enthusiasm of members of the force to fulfil the Army’s purpose to serve the nation and secure our people and territory. With continuing and steady successes in its strategic initiatives and base camps, the Philippine Army is confident that it will realize its 2028 vision to be a world class Army that is a source of national pride.


Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response

The Philippine Army is often at the forefront of disaster response and relief efforts. Its personnel are trained to provide assistance during natural disasters, ensuring the safety and well-being of affected communities.


International Peacekeeping

The Philippine Army actively participates in international peacekeeping missions under the United Nations. Its peacekeepers contribute to global peace and stability by serving in conflict zones and post-conflict areas around the world.


Military Modernization

The Philippine Army continues to invest in modernizing its equipment, technology, and capabilities to enhance its effectiveness in responding to evolving security challenges.


Partnerships and Alliances

The Philippine Army collaborates with allied forces, engaging in joint military exercises and partnerships to enhance its skills, share knowledge, and strengthen regional security.



Philippine Army Rank Structure


Officer

Rank groupGeneral / flag officersSenior officersJunior officersOfficer cadet
 Philippine Army
GeneralLieutenant GeneralMajor GeneralBrigadier GeneralColonelLieutenant ColonelCommandantLieutenant CommandantFirst LieutenantSub-Lieutenant
GeneralLieutenant generalMajor generalBrigadier generalColonelLieutenant ColonelMajorCaptainFirst lieutenantSecond lieutenant

Enlisted


Organization

The Philippine Army is headed by the Chief of the Army, attaining the rank of Lieutenant General. He is assisted by the Vice-Commander of the Philippine Army, and the Chief of Staff, Philippine Army in charge on organizational and administrative matters, both holding the ranks of Major General.

The Philippine Army consists of 11 infantry divisions, 1 armor division, 1 combined arms brigade, 1 artillery regiment, 5 engineering brigades, 1 aviation regiment, and 7 combat support units which are spread throughout the Philippine Archipelago.


Regular Units

The Philippine Army has several regular units (Infantry, Armor & Cavalry, Artillery, Special Forces, Intelligence, Signalling and Engineering units) and five regular support units (Medical, Ordinance, Quartermaster, Finance and Adjutant General units) dedicated to both counter-insurgency and conventional army operations.

  • Infantry
  • Armor and Cavalry
  • Artillery
  • Special Forces
  • Military Intelligence
  • Corps of Engineers
  • Signal Corps
  • Medical Services
  • Ordinance Service
  • Quartermaster Service
  • Finance Service
  • Adjutant General Service
  • Commands

The Army has 4 support commands, and is responsible for the handling of reserves, creating doctrines and training operations, and overall installation and combat support in the army's operations.

  • Reserve Command
  • Training and Doctrine Command – Training Command, Philippine Army, established 1986, was reorganised as TRADOC effective March 1, 1995.
  • Army Support Command
  • Installation Management Command (Provisional)



Infantry Divisions

The Army has a total of 11 infantry divisions, composed of 2-4 infantry brigades. The infantry divisions are also part of the 6 Unified Commands of the AFP, and are responsible for overall infantry operations within their respective areas of responsibility.

  • 1st Infantry "Tabak" Division
  • 2nd Infantry "Jungle Fighter" Division
  • 3rd Infantry "Spearhead Troopers" Division
  • 4th Infantry "Diamond" Division
  • 5th Infantry "Star" Division
  • 6th Infantry "Kampilan" Division
  • 7th Infantry "Kaugnay" Division
  • 8th Infantry "Storm Trooper" Division
  • 9th Infantry "Spear" Division
  • 10th Infantry "Agila" Division
  • 11th Infantry "Alakdan" Division

Soldiers of the 11th "Alakdan" Infantry Division


Combined Arms Brigade

The Army has one combined arms brigade, and also serves as a rapid deployment force, combined in one major unit, and serves as a major maneuver unit, capable of rapid mobilization and conventional warfare.
  • 1st Brigade Combat Team "Aegis"


Armor, Cavalry and Mechanized Support Units

The Army has one armor division, comprising two mechanized brigades, six mechanized battalions, seven separate cavalry squadrons, a maintenance unit and an aviation arm. The unit is responsible for mechanized fire support, as well as the deployment of mobile infantry brigades and armored reconnaissance units.

  • Armor "Pambato" Division (formerly Mechanized Infantry Division)
    • 1st Mechanized Infantry (Maasahan) Brigade
    • 2nd Mechanized Infantry (Magbalantay) Brigade
      • 1st Tank (Masikan) Battalion
        • 1st Mechanized Infantry (Lakan) Battalion
        • 2nd Mechanized Infantry (Makasag) Battalion
        • 3rd Mechanized Infantry (Makatarungan) Battalion
        • 4th Mechanized Infantry (Kalasag) Battalion
        • 5th Mechanized Infantry (Kaagapay) Battalion
        • 6th Mechanized Infantry (Salaknib) Battalion
          • 1st Cavalry (Tagapanguna) Squadron
          • 2nd Cavalry (Kaagapay) Squadron
          • 3rd Cavalry (Masigasig) Squadron
            • 1st Cavalry (Rapido) Company (S)
            • 2nd Cavalry (Tagapaglingkod) Company (S)
            • 3rd Cavalry (Katapangan) Company (S)
            • 4th Cavalry (Karangalan) Company (S)
            • 5th Cavalry (Kasangga) Company (S)
            • 6th Cavalry (Paghiliugyon) Company (S)
            • 7th Cavalry (Masasanigan) Company (S)
          • Armor Maintenance (Masinop) Battalion

Philippine Army M113A2 FSV

Artillery Units

The Army has one artillery regiment, comprising nine artillery battalions and six artillery battery units, responsible of overall artillery fire support to the army's maneuver units.

  • Army Artillery "King of Battle" Regiment (AAR)
    • 1st Field Artillery "Beat 'Em" Battalion
    • 2nd Field Artillery "First Round Accuracy" Battalion
    • 3rd Field Artillery "Hell Every Shell" Battalion
    • 4th Field Artillery "Strike from Afar" Battalion
    • 5th Field Artillery Battalion
    • 6th Field Artillery "Deadly Accurate" Battalion
    • 7th Field Artillery "Steel Rain" Battalion
    • 8th Field Artillery Battalion
    • 9th Field Artillery "Firestorm" Battalion
    • 10th Field Artillery "Rolling Thunder" Battalion (155mm Self Propelled)
      • 1st Field Artillery (155mm Self Propelled) Battery
      • 2nd Field Artillery (155mm Self Propelled) Battery
    • 1st Multiple Launch Rocket System Battery (1MLRS Btry)
    • 2nd Multiple Launch Rocket System Battery (2MLRS Btry)
    • 1st Land-based Missile System Battery (1LBMS Btry)
    • 1st Air Defense Artillery Battery (1ADA Btry)
    • 2nd Air Defense Artillery Battery (2ADA Btry)


ATTRACTIONS TO SEE IN MANILA 

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Engineering Units

The Army has 5 engineering brigades, responsible for overall engineering support, construction of army facilities, and counter-mobility operations.

  • 51st Engineer Brigade
    • 525th Engineer Combat "Mandirigtas" Battalion
    • 564th Engineer Construction "Tagabuklod" Battalion
    • 522nd Engineer Construction "Central Luzon Builders" Battalion
    • 548th Engineer Construction "Essayons" Battalion
    • 513th Engineer Construction "Nasiglat" Battalion
    • 514th Engineer Construction "Ang Gumagawa" Battalion
    • 565th Engineer Construction "Bikol Builders" Battalion
    • Engineer Support "Kaakibat" Company
  • 52nd Engineer Brigade
  • 53rd Engineer Brigade
  • 54th Engineer "Sarangay" Brigade
    • 545th Engineer "Peaceseeker" Battalion
    • 547th Engineer "Agila" Battalion
    • 549th Engineer "Kapayapaan" Battalion
    • Engineer "Primemover" Support Company
    • Headquarters and Headquarters "Provider" Company
  • 55th Engineer "Mobilizer" Brigade
    • 500th Engineer Combat Battalion
    • 551st Engineer Battalion
    • 553rd Engineer Battalion
    • 554th Engineer Battalion


Aviation Unit

The Army has one aviation regiment, which is part of the Army's Armor Division, responsible for reconnaissance and airborne operations such as aerial transport and medical evacuation duties. The unit is also undergoing significant upgrades as the Army slowly fulfills its modernization efforts and will soon be responsible for future air support and improved transport operations.

  • Aviation "Hiraya" Regiment (Part of the Armor Division)


Combat Support Units

The Army has seven combat support units, responsible for overall combat support operations, ranging from communications, logistics, intelligence, ordinance disposal, enforcement, signalling, and services operations.

  • Army Signal Regiment
  • Civil-Military Operations Regiment
  • 1st Logistics Support Brigade
  • 191st Military Police Battalion
  • Army Intelligence Regiment
  • Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal Battalion
  • Headquarters & Headquarters Service (Tagapaglaan) Battalion


Combat Service Support Units

The Army has 14 combat service support units, responsible for overall organizational support; as well as public, information, and military law affairs; security and escort operations; and medical, dental and religious services.

  • Finance Center Philippine Army
  • Philippine Army Band (formally known as Headquarters Philippine Army Band)
  • Philippine Army Nurse Corps
  • Philippine Army Medical Corps
  • Philippine Army Dental Service
  • Philippine Army Security and Escort Battalion
  • Philippine Army Public Affairs Office
  • The Armor School (Kahusayan)
  • Philippine Army Medical Administrative Corps
  • Philippine Army Veterinary Corps
  • Judge Advocate General Service
  • Corps of Professors
  • Army Chief Chaplain Service


Special Forces Units

The Philippine Army has three special operations regiments dedicated to special operations. These units report directly to the AFP Special Operations Command (SOCOM):

  • AFP Special Operations Command (SOCOM)
  • 1st Scout Ranger Regiment
  • Special Forces Regiment (Philippines)
  • Light Reaction Regiment


Training and Professionalism

Army personnel undergo rigorous training, including Basic Military Training (BMT), to instill discipline, teamwork, and technical expertise. Continuous professional development programs ensure that soldiers are well-equipped with the latest skills and knowledge.

If you wanted to be enlisted, here's a guide on how to Join the Philippine Army


ACTIVITIES AND TOURS IN MANILA

Philippine Army Bases

The Army, being the dominant branch of the AFP, has maintained a large number of bases throughout the country compared to other branches. They have used these bases in support of their operations nationwide.

LUZON
  • Camp Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo - Quezon City
  • Camp Gen. Rigoberto Atienza - Libis, Quezon City
  • Fort Bonifacio - Taguig City
  • Camp Melchor F. Dela Cruz - Upi, Gamu, Isabela
  • Fort Gen. Gregorio H. Del Pilar - Baguio
  • Camp Lt. Tito Abat - Manaoag, Pangasinan
  • Fort Ramon Magsaysay - Nueva Ecija
  • Camp Tinio - Cabanatuan
  • Camp Servillano Aquino - Tarlac City
  • Camp O'Donnell - Santa Lucia, Capas, Tarlac
  • Camp Tecson - San Miguel, Bulacan
  • Camp Gen. Mateo M. Capinpin - Tanay, Rizal
  • Camp General Mariano Riego De Dios Tanza, Cavite
  • Camp Alfredo Santos - Calauag, Quezon
  • Camp Guillermo Nakar - Lucena City
  • Camp Elias Angeles - San Jose, Pili, Camarines Sur
  • Camp Weene Martillana - San Jose, Pili, Camarines Sur
  • Camp General Macario Sakay - Los Baños, Laguna
  • Camp General Simeon A. Ola - Legazpi, Albay

VISAYAS 
  • Camp Lapu-Lapu - Lahug, Cebu City
  • Camp Major Jesus M. Jizmundo - Libas, Banga, Aklan
  • Camp Gen. Macario G. Peralta, Jr. - Jamindan, Capiz
  • Camp Gen. Adriano Hernandez - Dingle, Iloilo
  • Camp Monteclaro - Igtuba, Miagao, Iloilo
  • Camp Tirambulo - McKinley, Guihulngan, Negros Oriental
  • Camp Leon Kilat - Tanjay, Negros Oriental
  • Camp Ruperto Kangleon - Palo, Leyte
  • Camp Jorge Downes - Ormoc, Leyte
  • Camp General Vicente Lukban - Catbalogan, Samar
  • Camp Martin Delgado - Iloilo City
  • Camp Francisco C. Fernandez Jr. - Agan-an, Sibulan, Negros Oriental

MINDANAO
  • Camp General Basilio Navarro - Zamboanga City
  • Camp Panacan - Naval Station Felix Apolinario - Panacan, Davao City
  • Camp Edilberto Evangelista - Patag, Cagayan de Oro
  • Kuta Major Cesar L. Sang-an - Pulacan, Labangan, Zamboanga del Sur
  • Camp Colonel Oscar F. Natividad - Manolo Fortich, Bukidnon
  • Camp Osito D. Bahian - Malaybalay, Bukidnon
  • Camp Ranao - Marawi City
  • Camp Allere - Salvador, Lanao del Norte
  • Camp Duma Sinsuat - Barira, Maguindanao
  • Camp Brig. Gen. Gonzalo H. Siongco - Datu Odin Sinsuat, Maguindanao
  • Camp Robert Eduard M. Lucero - Nasapian, Carmen, Cotabato
  • Camp Paulino Santos - Dado, Alamada, Cotabato
  • Camp Brig. Gen. Hermenegildo Agaab - Malandag, Malungon, Sarangani
  • Camp Overton - Suarez, Iligan
  • Camp Fermin G. Lira, Jr. - Bulaong Road, General Santos
  • Torrey Barracks - Malabang, Lanao del Sur
  • Camp Amai Pakpak - Marawi, Lanao del Sur
  • Camp Cabunbata - Cabunbata, Isabela, Basilan
  • Camp General Manuel T. Yan Sr. - Tuboran, Mawab, Davao de Oro
  • Camp San Gabriel - Mintal, Davao City
  • Camp Arturo Enrile - Malagutay, Zamboanga City
  • Camp Teodulfo Bautista - Busbus, Jolo, Sulu
  • Camp Romualdo C. Rubi - Bancasi, Butuan
  • Camp Datu Lipus Makapandong - Prosperidad, Agusan del Sur


Engagements

  • Philippine Revolution
  • Spanish–American War
  • Philippine–American War
  • World War II
  • Cold War
  • Hukbalahap Rebellion
  • Korean War
  • Vietnam War
  • Persian Gulf War
  • Iraq War
  • United Nations peacekeeping
  • 1999 East Timorese crisis
  • Operation Enduring Freedom – Philippines
  • Communist Insurgencies
  • Islamic Insurgencies
  • Battle of Camp Abubakar
  • Operation Darkhorse
  • International military intervention against ISIL
  • Manila Peninsula siege
  • Battle of Zamboanga
  • February 2016 Butig clash
  • November 2016 Butig clash
  • Battle of Marawi

Philippine Army during the Marawi Seige

The Philippine Army stands as a symbol of bravery, discipline, and service to the nation. Its dedicated soldiers, officers, and personnel embody the spirit of patriotism as they protect the Philippines and its people, both in times of peace and in the face of adversity. Through their unwavering commitment, the Philippine Army remains a cornerstone of the nation's security and pride.


Philippine Army

Headquarters: Fort Andres Bonifacio, Taguig City, Philippines
Websitearmy.mil.ph
FacebookPhilippine Army


Army Recruitment Office


  • Location: CMOR Compound, Lawton Avenue, Fort Bonifacio, Taguig City
  • Contact Numbers: 09269297984 / 09610339359 or 8459555 local 6843
  • Facebook Pagehttps://www.facebook.com/AROLuzonOfficialPage
  • Email: armyrecruitmentoffice.luzon@yahoo.com


Army Recruitment Office Visayas


Army Recruitment Office Mindanao


Guide to Philippine Army (History, Functions and Organization Structure)


The Philippine Army: Guardians of the Nation's Peace and Security

The Philippine Army, established on December 21, 1935, is the ground warfare branch of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP).

Committed to serving the nation, the Philippine Army plays a vital role in ensuring the country's territorial integrity, national sovereignty, and internal stability. Here's an overview of this esteemed military organization:



Philippine Army in Details

Philippine Army
official seal
Founded: December 21, 1935; 87 years ago
Country: Philippines
Type: Army
Role: Ground Warfare
Size: 101,250 active personnel, 100,000 ready reserves (as of writing)
Part of: Armed Forces of the Philippines
Garrison/HQFort Andres Bonifacio, Taguig City, Philippines
Motto: "Serving the People, Securing the Land"
Colors: Army Green 
Anniversary: March 22, Army Day


Mission and Vision


Mission: To provide the country with a credible and responsive Army capable of accomplishing its mission across the spectrum of conflict in the defense of the state and the people.

Vision: A professional, mission-ready, and highly capable Army that is a source of national pride.

Philippine Army Flag
Loading...

Roles and Responsibilities

National Defense: The Philippine Army is at the forefront of defending the nation against external threats, safeguarding the country's borders, and ensuring national security.

Internal Security: The Army plays a crucial role in addressing internal security challenges, including counterterrorism, counterinsurgency, disaster response, and peacekeeping operations.

Community Engagement: Beyond military operations, the Philippine Army actively engages with local communities, promoting development initiatives, conducting medical missions, and participating in outreach programs.

Philippine Army Headquarters at Fort Andres Bonifacio, Taguig City


Philippine Army History


Battles before Colonization

The beginnings of the Filipino land forces dates back before the Spanish and American colonial period. In that time, clans and barangays from different regions form their own armed groups primarily composed of hunters and land fighters. They served as defenders of the tribes or as warriors sent on strike missions against other barangays. On occasions, some clan forces would form alliances to attack more powerful opponents. Conventional weaponry during the pre‐colonial era includes Kris and Kampilan, Blowguns, and Lantaka. War-fare instruments of the Filipino forces continued to develop over time.

 

The Forces’ First Test (1521)

On April 27, 1521, the Filipino land forces were put to test. The Spaniards’ arrival in the 16th century in Mactan, Cebu ignited the Battle of Mactan as Lapu-Lapu defied to render loyalty to Magellan. The incident demonstrated the combined might of Filipino land forces complemented by early naval elements. Lapu-Lapu’s force was not “formally organized” as a Filipino Army during that time but the present‐day Philippine Army traces its beginnings to this brave and proud force of warriors of the Philippine Islands.

 

The Fight for Freedom (1892-1898)

The three century rule of the Spaniards led the Filipino warriors to form resistance movements to fight for their freedom. The Filipino people were clamoring for reforms and an end to the foreign rule because of the growing restiveness in the colony. On July 7, 1892, Andres Bonifacio founded the Samahang Kataastaasan, Kagalanggalang Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan, or simply “Katipunan” to muster freedom loving Filipinos for armed revolt. The Katipunan formed the nucleus of the Revolutionary Philippine Army.

Almost a year after the outbreak of war between the members of the Katipunan and the Spanish troops, another freedom fighter from a prominent clan ‒ Emilio Aguinaldo ‒ was elected President of the Philippine Revolutionary Government at the Tejeros Convention on March 22, 1897 in Tejeros, San Francisco de Malabon in Cavite. Artemio Ricarte, a Katipunan leader of numerous Filipino battles against Spain was also elected as Captain General of the Ejercito en la Republica de las Islas Filipinas or the Army of the Philippine Republic.

After years of fighting for freedom, of On June 12, 1898, the Filipino people achieved their awaited freedom as General Emilio Aguinaldo declared the Philippine’s Independence from Spain.

 

Philippine Army’s Rebirth (1898-1935)

The Filipino troops were to enjoy only a brief sense of victory and respite from combat when American forces came in to establish rule in the islands by virtue of the Treaty of Paris, which Spain co-signed with America on December 10, 1898. The treaty ceded the Philippines to the United States.

The Filipino-American War erupted on February 4, 1899. Due to the superiority of American arms, the Filipinos fell from one position to another until they were forced to disband. Even after the official cessation of hostilities and as the Americans have established government in 1901, the Filipino revolutionaries continued their struggle for freedom.

Aguinaldo was captured by American forces on March 23, 1901. The surrender of one of the most prominent leaders of the Philippine Revolution, General Miguel Malvar, on April 16, 1902 marked the official end of the “Philippine insurrection.” When the Philippines was established as a Commonwealth Republic of the United States of America on 15 November 1935, its President, Manuel Luis Quezon signed Commonwealth Act No.1, popularly known as the National Defense Act, which paved way for the birth of the new Philippine Army.

 

In World War II (1941-1945)

The onset of World War II in 1941 tested the might of the Commonwealth Philippine Army. Its two regular and ten reserve divisions undertook the defense of the Philippines. These divisions were incorporated into the United States Armed Forces in the Far East (USAFFE) under the command of General Douglas McArthur. Four military areas were activated after the war. The National Defense Forces organized under the National Defense Act was reorganized into the Armed Forces of the Philippines along which came the birth of four major services.

The post‐WWII Philippine Army was to be seen fulfilling the Philippine government’s commitment as a member of the United Nations to help bring peace in war‐ torn neighbor states. The Philippine Army spared five battalions which formed the Philippine Expeditionary Forces to Korea (PEFTOK) to carry out the campaign for democracy. The Philippine Civic Action Group to Vietnam (PhilCAGV) was sent to South Vietnam on a mission of peace, where army engineers helped build communities and army doctors and nurses provided medical services to the people.

 

Building the Headquarters; Expanding Horizons (1957- Early 70’s)

On July 10, 1957, the Philippine Army established its headquarters under the leadership of Brigadier General Leoncio S. Tan. The onset of the sixties ushered an expansion of the army's roles, which include participation in the socio-economic programs of the country, among others. To achieve greater flexibility and effectiveness, infantry divisions took the place of the military areas in the seventies.

 

The Army as a Nation Builder (1972-1986)

On September 21, 1972, the Martial Law era began. During the decade, military operations supported by civic action blocked the escalation of insurgency. The 1980s saw the Philippine Army in increasing peace and development roles and in a period of transition after the EDSA‐People Power Revolution, which spurred various initiatives toward transformation and reforms in internal security operations. The Philippine Army became more cognizant of its role not only as protector of the Filipino people, but also a partner in nation building.

 

Continued Sacrifice, Bravery and Patriotism (2000s)

On September 9, 2013, the Philippine Army prevented members of the Moro National Liberation Front to take over Zamboanga City which led to three-week fight. Twenty five government soldiers made the ultimate sacrifice in order to save innocent civilians and regain peace in the city.

On May 2017 to October 2017, a five-month long siege brought casualties and displaced individuals from their homes in Marawi, Lanao del Sur. The Battle of Marawi was one of the largest and longest urban warfare of the Philippine Army. One hundred sixty five government forces lost their lives to liberate the city from conflict. The Philippine Army continue play an important role in rebuilding the city.

 

The Philippine Army Today

Today, the Philippine Army supports the government’s whole-of-nation approach against insurgency led by the National Task Force to End the Local Communist Armed Conflict. The Army provides efficient instrument and structure for the employment of the whole-of-nation approach and also assists in the implementation of the Enhanced Comprehensive Local Integration Program offered to former rebels. These efforts complement the Army’s sustained anti-terrorism operations on the ground.

Moreover, the Philippine Army’s mandate led to a breakthrough with the framing of the Army Transformation Roadmap 2028, which was implemented in 2010. Capability upgrades, modernization initiatives, and campaigns for good governance and performance excellence in the transformation program ushered the Philippine Army to welcome paradigm shifts and optimistic milestones, which continue to fire up the enthusiasm of members of the force to fulfil the Army’s purpose to serve the nation and secure our people and territory. With continuing and steady successes in its strategic initiatives and base camps, the Philippine Army is confident that it will realize its 2028 vision to be a world class Army that is a source of national pride.


Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response

The Philippine Army is often at the forefront of disaster response and relief efforts. Its personnel are trained to provide assistance during natural disasters, ensuring the safety and well-being of affected communities.


International Peacekeeping

The Philippine Army actively participates in international peacekeeping missions under the United Nations. Its peacekeepers contribute to global peace and stability by serving in conflict zones and post-conflict areas around the world.


Military Modernization

The Philippine Army continues to invest in modernizing its equipment, technology, and capabilities to enhance its effectiveness in responding to evolving security challenges.


Partnerships and Alliances

The Philippine Army collaborates with allied forces, engaging in joint military exercises and partnerships to enhance its skills, share knowledge, and strengthen regional security.



Philippine Army Rank Structure


Officer

Rank groupGeneral / flag officersSenior officersJunior officersOfficer cadet
 Philippine Army
GeneralLieutenant GeneralMajor GeneralBrigadier GeneralColonelLieutenant ColonelCommandantLieutenant CommandantFirst LieutenantSub-Lieutenant
GeneralLieutenant generalMajor generalBrigadier generalColonelLieutenant ColonelMajorCaptainFirst lieutenantSecond lieutenant

Enlisted


Organization

The Philippine Army is headed by the Chief of the Army, attaining the rank of Lieutenant General. He is assisted by the Vice-Commander of the Philippine Army, and the Chief of Staff, Philippine Army in charge on organizational and administrative matters, both holding the ranks of Major General.

The Philippine Army consists of 11 infantry divisions, 1 armor division, 1 combined arms brigade, 1 artillery regiment, 5 engineering brigades, 1 aviation regiment, and 7 combat support units which are spread throughout the Philippine Archipelago.


Regular Units

The Philippine Army has several regular units (Infantry, Armor & Cavalry, Artillery, Special Forces, Intelligence, Signalling and Engineering units) and five regular support units (Medical, Ordinance, Quartermaster, Finance and Adjutant General units) dedicated to both counter-insurgency and conventional army operations.

  • Infantry
  • Armor and Cavalry
  • Artillery
  • Special Forces
  • Military Intelligence
  • Corps of Engineers
  • Signal Corps
  • Medical Services
  • Ordinance Service
  • Quartermaster Service
  • Finance Service
  • Adjutant General Service
  • Commands

The Army has 4 support commands, and is responsible for the handling of reserves, creating doctrines and training operations, and overall installation and combat support in the army's operations.

  • Reserve Command
  • Training and Doctrine Command – Training Command, Philippine Army, established 1986, was reorganised as TRADOC effective March 1, 1995.
  • Army Support Command
  • Installation Management Command (Provisional)



Infantry Divisions

The Army has a total of 11 infantry divisions, composed of 2-4 infantry brigades. The infantry divisions are also part of the 6 Unified Commands of the AFP, and are responsible for overall infantry operations within their respective areas of responsibility.

  • 1st Infantry "Tabak" Division
  • 2nd Infantry "Jungle Fighter" Division
  • 3rd Infantry "Spearhead Troopers" Division
  • 4th Infantry "Diamond" Division
  • 5th Infantry "Star" Division
  • 6th Infantry "Kampilan" Division
  • 7th Infantry "Kaugnay" Division
  • 8th Infantry "Storm Trooper" Division
  • 9th Infantry "Spear" Division
  • 10th Infantry "Agila" Division
  • 11th Infantry "Alakdan" Division

Soldiers of the 11th "Alakdan" Infantry Division


Combined Arms Brigade

The Army has one combined arms brigade, and also serves as a rapid deployment force, combined in one major unit, and serves as a major maneuver unit, capable of rapid mobilization and conventional warfare.
  • 1st Brigade Combat Team "Aegis"


Armor, Cavalry and Mechanized Support Units

The Army has one armor division, comprising two mechanized brigades, six mechanized battalions, seven separate cavalry squadrons, a maintenance unit and an aviation arm. The unit is responsible for mechanized fire support, as well as the deployment of mobile infantry brigades and armored reconnaissance units.

  • Armor "Pambato" Division (formerly Mechanized Infantry Division)
    • 1st Mechanized Infantry (Maasahan) Brigade
    • 2nd Mechanized Infantry (Magbalantay) Brigade
      • 1st Tank (Masikan) Battalion
        • 1st Mechanized Infantry (Lakan) Battalion
        • 2nd Mechanized Infantry (Makasag) Battalion
        • 3rd Mechanized Infantry (Makatarungan) Battalion
        • 4th Mechanized Infantry (Kalasag) Battalion
        • 5th Mechanized Infantry (Kaagapay) Battalion
        • 6th Mechanized Infantry (Salaknib) Battalion
          • 1st Cavalry (Tagapanguna) Squadron
          • 2nd Cavalry (Kaagapay) Squadron
          • 3rd Cavalry (Masigasig) Squadron
            • 1st Cavalry (Rapido) Company (S)
            • 2nd Cavalry (Tagapaglingkod) Company (S)
            • 3rd Cavalry (Katapangan) Company (S)
            • 4th Cavalry (Karangalan) Company (S)
            • 5th Cavalry (Kasangga) Company (S)
            • 6th Cavalry (Paghiliugyon) Company (S)
            • 7th Cavalry (Masasanigan) Company (S)
          • Armor Maintenance (Masinop) Battalion

Philippine Army M113A2 FSV

Artillery Units

The Army has one artillery regiment, comprising nine artillery battalions and six artillery battery units, responsible of overall artillery fire support to the army's maneuver units.

  • Army Artillery "King of Battle" Regiment (AAR)
    • 1st Field Artillery "Beat 'Em" Battalion
    • 2nd Field Artillery "First Round Accuracy" Battalion
    • 3rd Field Artillery "Hell Every Shell" Battalion
    • 4th Field Artillery "Strike from Afar" Battalion
    • 5th Field Artillery Battalion
    • 6th Field Artillery "Deadly Accurate" Battalion
    • 7th Field Artillery "Steel Rain" Battalion
    • 8th Field Artillery Battalion
    • 9th Field Artillery "Firestorm" Battalion
    • 10th Field Artillery "Rolling Thunder" Battalion (155mm Self Propelled)
      • 1st Field Artillery (155mm Self Propelled) Battery
      • 2nd Field Artillery (155mm Self Propelled) Battery
    • 1st Multiple Launch Rocket System Battery (1MLRS Btry)
    • 2nd Multiple Launch Rocket System Battery (2MLRS Btry)
    • 1st Land-based Missile System Battery (1LBMS Btry)
    • 1st Air Defense Artillery Battery (1ADA Btry)
    • 2nd Air Defense Artillery Battery (2ADA Btry)


ATTRACTIONS TO SEE IN MANILA 

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Engineering Units

The Army has 5 engineering brigades, responsible for overall engineering support, construction of army facilities, and counter-mobility operations.

  • 51st Engineer Brigade
    • 525th Engineer Combat "Mandirigtas" Battalion
    • 564th Engineer Construction "Tagabuklod" Battalion
    • 522nd Engineer Construction "Central Luzon Builders" Battalion
    • 548th Engineer Construction "Essayons" Battalion
    • 513th Engineer Construction "Nasiglat" Battalion
    • 514th Engineer Construction "Ang Gumagawa" Battalion
    • 565th Engineer Construction "Bikol Builders" Battalion
    • Engineer Support "Kaakibat" Company
  • 52nd Engineer Brigade
  • 53rd Engineer Brigade
  • 54th Engineer "Sarangay" Brigade
    • 545th Engineer "Peaceseeker" Battalion
    • 547th Engineer "Agila" Battalion
    • 549th Engineer "Kapayapaan" Battalion
    • Engineer "Primemover" Support Company
    • Headquarters and Headquarters "Provider" Company
  • 55th Engineer "Mobilizer" Brigade
    • 500th Engineer Combat Battalion
    • 551st Engineer Battalion
    • 553rd Engineer Battalion
    • 554th Engineer Battalion


Aviation Unit

The Army has one aviation regiment, which is part of the Army's Armor Division, responsible for reconnaissance and airborne operations such as aerial transport and medical evacuation duties. The unit is also undergoing significant upgrades as the Army slowly fulfills its modernization efforts and will soon be responsible for future air support and improved transport operations.

  • Aviation "Hiraya" Regiment (Part of the Armor Division)


Combat Support Units

The Army has seven combat support units, responsible for overall combat support operations, ranging from communications, logistics, intelligence, ordinance disposal, enforcement, signalling, and services operations.

  • Army Signal Regiment
  • Civil-Military Operations Regiment
  • 1st Logistics Support Brigade
  • 191st Military Police Battalion
  • Army Intelligence Regiment
  • Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal Battalion
  • Headquarters & Headquarters Service (Tagapaglaan) Battalion


Combat Service Support Units

The Army has 14 combat service support units, responsible for overall organizational support; as well as public, information, and military law affairs; security and escort operations; and medical, dental and religious services.

  • Finance Center Philippine Army
  • Philippine Army Band (formally known as Headquarters Philippine Army Band)
  • Philippine Army Nurse Corps
  • Philippine Army Medical Corps
  • Philippine Army Dental Service
  • Philippine Army Security and Escort Battalion
  • Philippine Army Public Affairs Office
  • The Armor School (Kahusayan)
  • Philippine Army Medical Administrative Corps
  • Philippine Army Veterinary Corps
  • Judge Advocate General Service
  • Corps of Professors
  • Army Chief Chaplain Service


Special Forces Units

The Philippine Army has three special operations regiments dedicated to special operations. These units report directly to the AFP Special Operations Command (SOCOM):

  • AFP Special Operations Command (SOCOM)
  • 1st Scout Ranger Regiment
  • Special Forces Regiment (Philippines)
  • Light Reaction Regiment


Training and Professionalism

Army personnel undergo rigorous training, including Basic Military Training (BMT), to instill discipline, teamwork, and technical expertise. Continuous professional development programs ensure that soldiers are well-equipped with the latest skills and knowledge.

If you wanted to be enlisted, here's a guide on how to Join the Philippine Army


ACTIVITIES AND TOURS IN MANILA

Philippine Army Bases

The Army, being the dominant branch of the AFP, has maintained a large number of bases throughout the country compared to other branches. They have used these bases in support of their operations nationwide.

LUZON
  • Camp Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo - Quezon City
  • Camp Gen. Rigoberto Atienza - Libis, Quezon City
  • Fort Bonifacio - Taguig City
  • Camp Melchor F. Dela Cruz - Upi, Gamu, Isabela
  • Fort Gen. Gregorio H. Del Pilar - Baguio
  • Camp Lt. Tito Abat - Manaoag, Pangasinan
  • Fort Ramon Magsaysay - Nueva Ecija
  • Camp Tinio - Cabanatuan
  • Camp Servillano Aquino - Tarlac City
  • Camp O'Donnell - Santa Lucia, Capas, Tarlac
  • Camp Tecson - San Miguel, Bulacan
  • Camp Gen. Mateo M. Capinpin - Tanay, Rizal
  • Camp General Mariano Riego De Dios Tanza, Cavite
  • Camp Alfredo Santos - Calauag, Quezon
  • Camp Guillermo Nakar - Lucena City
  • Camp Elias Angeles - San Jose, Pili, Camarines Sur
  • Camp Weene Martillana - San Jose, Pili, Camarines Sur
  • Camp General Macario Sakay - Los Baños, Laguna
  • Camp General Simeon A. Ola - Legazpi, Albay

VISAYAS 
  • Camp Lapu-Lapu - Lahug, Cebu City
  • Camp Major Jesus M. Jizmundo - Libas, Banga, Aklan
  • Camp Gen. Macario G. Peralta, Jr. - Jamindan, Capiz
  • Camp Gen. Adriano Hernandez - Dingle, Iloilo
  • Camp Monteclaro - Igtuba, Miagao, Iloilo
  • Camp Tirambulo - McKinley, Guihulngan, Negros Oriental
  • Camp Leon Kilat - Tanjay, Negros Oriental
  • Camp Ruperto Kangleon - Palo, Leyte
  • Camp Jorge Downes - Ormoc, Leyte
  • Camp General Vicente Lukban - Catbalogan, Samar
  • Camp Martin Delgado - Iloilo City
  • Camp Francisco C. Fernandez Jr. - Agan-an, Sibulan, Negros Oriental

MINDANAO
  • Camp General Basilio Navarro - Zamboanga City
  • Camp Panacan - Naval Station Felix Apolinario - Panacan, Davao City
  • Camp Edilberto Evangelista - Patag, Cagayan de Oro
  • Kuta Major Cesar L. Sang-an - Pulacan, Labangan, Zamboanga del Sur
  • Camp Colonel Oscar F. Natividad - Manolo Fortich, Bukidnon
  • Camp Osito D. Bahian - Malaybalay, Bukidnon
  • Camp Ranao - Marawi City
  • Camp Allere - Salvador, Lanao del Norte
  • Camp Duma Sinsuat - Barira, Maguindanao
  • Camp Brig. Gen. Gonzalo H. Siongco - Datu Odin Sinsuat, Maguindanao
  • Camp Robert Eduard M. Lucero - Nasapian, Carmen, Cotabato
  • Camp Paulino Santos - Dado, Alamada, Cotabato
  • Camp Brig. Gen. Hermenegildo Agaab - Malandag, Malungon, Sarangani
  • Camp Overton - Suarez, Iligan
  • Camp Fermin G. Lira, Jr. - Bulaong Road, General Santos
  • Torrey Barracks - Malabang, Lanao del Sur
  • Camp Amai Pakpak - Marawi, Lanao del Sur
  • Camp Cabunbata - Cabunbata, Isabela, Basilan
  • Camp General Manuel T. Yan Sr. - Tuboran, Mawab, Davao de Oro
  • Camp San Gabriel - Mintal, Davao City
  • Camp Arturo Enrile - Malagutay, Zamboanga City
  • Camp Teodulfo Bautista - Busbus, Jolo, Sulu
  • Camp Romualdo C. Rubi - Bancasi, Butuan
  • Camp Datu Lipus Makapandong - Prosperidad, Agusan del Sur


Engagements

  • Philippine Revolution
  • Spanish–American War
  • Philippine–American War
  • World War II
  • Cold War
  • Hukbalahap Rebellion
  • Korean War
  • Vietnam War
  • Persian Gulf War
  • Iraq War
  • United Nations peacekeeping
  • 1999 East Timorese crisis
  • Operation Enduring Freedom – Philippines
  • Communist Insurgencies
  • Islamic Insurgencies
  • Battle of Camp Abubakar
  • Operation Darkhorse
  • International military intervention against ISIL
  • Manila Peninsula siege
  • Battle of Zamboanga
  • February 2016 Butig clash
  • November 2016 Butig clash
  • Battle of Marawi

Philippine Army during the Marawi Seige

The Philippine Army stands as a symbol of bravery, discipline, and service to the nation. Its dedicated soldiers, officers, and personnel embody the spirit of patriotism as they protect the Philippines and its people, both in times of peace and in the face of adversity. Through their unwavering commitment, the Philippine Army remains a cornerstone of the nation's security and pride.


Philippine Army

Headquarters: Fort Andres Bonifacio, Taguig City, Philippines
Websitearmy.mil.ph
FacebookPhilippine Army


Army Recruitment Office


  • Location: CMOR Compound, Lawton Avenue, Fort Bonifacio, Taguig City
  • Contact Numbers: 09269297984 / 09610339359 or 8459555 local 6843
  • Facebook Pagehttps://www.facebook.com/AROLuzonOfficialPage
  • Email: armyrecruitmentoffice.luzon@yahoo.com


Army Recruitment Office Visayas


Army Recruitment Office Mindanao


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